Slasher Flick RPG Review

Like Slasher/Horror movies where the characters are always getting split up and making bad decisions? Have I found a game for you! Slasher Flick from Spectrum Games is a Slasher/Horror flick ‘Genre Emulation’ game that allows players to take on the roles of characters within a slasher flick. One player takes on the roll of the Director which is similar to a Game Master or Dungeon Master in other tabletop RPGs. The other players all control a Primary character along with one or more Secondary and Tertiary characters. Players earn Genre Points for having their characters say and do things that would happen in a typical slasher flick. Characters invariably end up in a multitude of Kill Scenes with the Killer/Monster/etc. where they must earn Survival Points in order to make it out of the scene, otherwise they die. Both the Kill Scenes and character death happen, as you expect in a slasher flick, pretty frequently. Overall this game is quick to learn, fun to play and does a great job doing what it set out to do, emulating slasher movies.

The game’s mechanics are fairly simple. Whenever a situation comes up that has opposition or a chance of failure the player in control of the character has to make a roll of four dice. Get 2 or more matching numbers and you succeed, otherwise you fail. Hard rolls can drop the roll down to three dice and conversely having a skill can increase your dice pool to five. All rolls in the game are based around four basic stats: Brawn, Finesse, Brains, and Spirit. Every character has these rated either Poor, Normal or Good. The better a character is at something, the smaller the die they use for their roll. So if a character is Good at Brains they roll six sided dice (d6) where a character that was Poor would roll ten sided dice (d10). Primary characters typically have better stats and more bonuses where Secondaries do not.

One of the most fun things about Slasher Flick is that it rewards players for having their characters do non-optimal things that would happen in a movie by awarding Genre Points. Hear a noise in the basement and have your character go down alone while saying “I’ll be right back!” You earn a Genre Point! Sure that character may die but that gives the player more Genre Points to help their remaining characters and possibly win the game.

Kill Scenes are what the game, and Slasher Flicks for that matter, is all about and they run quite well. The mechanics work like anything else in the game, roll dice and look for matches, but there are several twists thrown in which can swing results. The general idea is that a character must earn a certain number of survival points during a Kill Scene to end the scene and make it out alive. If a character drops to negative Survival Points though they die! I have to admit that after reading the rules I was afraid the Kill Scenes would drag on a bit, and they do take a bit of time, but they actually run very smoothly and to be honest are the most fun part of the game. I’m speaking from only having played as the Director though so perhaps my love of killing PCs in Dungeons and Dragons is showing.

If you and your gaming group enjoy a good horror movie and are looking for a fun way to spend a session I highly recommend the Slasher Flick RPG. There are numerous scenarios available and the Director’s Cut of the game that I bought also has a ton of pregenerated characters you can either use directly or just for inspiration.

If you’d like to hear an example of how the game plays stay tuned as we’ll be releasing a podcast episode of us playing our first game, Murder at Red Beard Resort, in the next couple of weeks. You can also find a full list of Slasher Flick products here.

Product Review: Metallic Dice Games Dice Tray

MDG Dice Tray in Red Velvet

Greetings, Everyone!

As with any hobby, there are many items that are not necessary, but can significantly contribute to the enjoyment of the experience. I don’t have to wear a Chicago Bears jersey on game day, seeing as they still haven’t signed me to the squad (I’m cheap, Ryan Pace!), but it makes it more fun when I’m out in public and run into other fans. In the same way, there are many gaming accessories that aren’t required but can be very useful and make the games we play more enjoyable.

Many games rely on dice to produce the random results needed to play the game, and most players develop a “style” of rolling those dice quickly and conveniently. Some like to use dice towers, relishing every clack and clatter of the die as it falls through the tumblers within. Others like dice cups, swirling the dice within like a fine wine before authoritatively slamming the cup down to show the game who’s really in control. Then, there are the troglodytes that like to bowl the dice across the playing surface attempting to knock over all your meticulously painted miniatures. But the most civilized, well-mannered, and discerning gamers use a tray to gently cradle their favorite dice and ensure the fairest result. (No bias here!)

Today I will be reviewing Metallic Dice Games’ Collapsible Dice Trays. These retail for $16 normally, but I was able to snag a two-pack of them on Massdrop for $23. The trays are very portable because they unsnap and fold flat, making it very easy to throw into a bag for game night without taking up a lot of space. There is a leather (maybe?) backing on the outside, and a soft, velvet lining on the inside with some sort of stiff material in between. If you like to roll with fancier metallic dice (can damage a table because of their weight) or the semi-precious stone dice (can chip if treated roughly), I wouldn’t be without one of these bad boys. Measuring in at 10×10 inches, they are large enough to let the dice roll a little bit without taking up too much of the table real estate, which can be an issue with bigger games or smaller gaming spaces.

I picked up a blue one and a purple one (to match our Blood Bowl team colors), and liked them so much that I picked up another two-pack in red and black so we can have more around the table on Zombicide nights. Recently, I saw that they released a multi-colored one in a chevron pattern the last time they popped up on Massdrop, but it looks like the lining on that one might be a more standard cloth rather than the velvet. I’m sure that there are other dice trays that would be just as nice, but the price point for these in the two-pack was good and I was very impressed with the quality of these trays.

Fancy!!!

At our table, my teenager has a tendency to send dice careening around the room when he gets a little excited, so we spend a lot of time chasing dice. Of course, whenever it is a good roll it counts, but if it’s not what he was hoping to see we need to re-roll since it fell off the table (Seems legit….wait a minute!!!) So, I implemented a house rule that if it doesn’t end up in the tray it doesn’t count, no matter the result, and must be re-rolled. This has eliminated 95% of the dice on the floor (there’s still the odd one that bounces out or misses the tray), and has had the added benefit of eliminating “cocked” dice when playing games that involved uneven terrain features. If I’m using the trays away from home, I always let my opponent know how I use the tray and I’ve never had anyone complain. In fact, many roll their own dice in the trays as well!

So, readers…how do you roll at your table? Let us know in the comments if you use a tower, cup, tray, box lid, Vegas-style craps table, the hollowed-out skull of your enemy, etc. We’d love to know!